Corporate Massages Overview

South African companies invest extensively in the wellness of their employees by focussing on issues like personal health, fitness and stress recovery. Corporate Massages, designed to fit into the business activities of the company, should be an integral part of this approach.

“Some of our clients have a standing arrangement whereby we go to their facilities twice and four times a month” says Martina Laurie, CEO of Hands On Treatment an innovative wellness company. “An example is a multi-national company where we go to both their corporate offices and the factory every month.  The benefits of Corporate Massages are equally real for white and blue collar workers. Ultimately companies use Corporate Massages to enhance staff motivation and increase staff productivity.”

“The best way to deploy Corporate Massages,” Laurie went on “is to have the therapists move from workstation to workstation.  They are trained to move unobtrusively in the background and we do not use oils or creams.  That way there’s no disruption to the running of the office or the factory and all employees get an opportunity.  Some employees sit back for the Neck & Shoulder massage while others just keep on working – no-one refuses a massage!”

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Corporate Massages are also used for events, for example wellness days, golf days and even baby and bridal showers.  Again the best way is to have the therapists move between the people, but sometimes it is better to set up a massage station where people can go for their massages.  Hands On Treatment also provide one, two and three hour mobile pamper services.

Hands On Treatment support clients in all the major centres in South Africa and also provide services country wide.  Examples include a three day assignment with six therapists at a trade show in support of a major South African company; an assignment to just about all the retail branches of a major bank; and a telecommunications company where Corporate Massages were provided to the teams of staff working inordinately long hours to roll out a major new product line.